gasoline-station

gasoline-station:

Skymetric

by Lino Russo

The word skymetric is a construction composed by: sky and -metric (geometric).

The subject highlights the decontextualization of places and architectural spaces in order to alter the natural structure. These places considered have in common the fact to be all completely square, regular and schematic, so achieving geometric shots in a minimalist context, where the simplicity and cleanliness reign supreme. Another point in common is the sky, infact each shot shows with a light blue background that decisively contrasts the brilliant colors of the architectures. So this places will cease to exist, the vision that result, won’t be more accostable to the original, it will recognize only systematic and organized compositions and structures.”

gasoline-station

gasoline-station:

The Miniature Model Behind ‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’

Via

While “The Grand Budapest Hotel” is busy with smaller design elements, one of its most striking designs is the hotel itself. Outfitted in shades of pink and purple and situated atop a hill, the hotel is grandiose and picturesque. It also happens to be nine feet tall. For wide shots of the hotel, the director Wes Anderson and his team decided to use a handmade miniature model.

“I’ve always loved miniatures in general,” Mr. Anderson said, speaking by phone from Paris. “I just like the charm of them.” He used miniatures in “The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou” and more extensively in “Fantastic Mr. Fox.” He said he feels that audiences tend to recognize what is artificial, whether in computer-generated effects or otherwise, and that gave him liberty to use models. “The particular brand of artificiality that I like to use is an old-fashioned one,” he added.

He collaborated again with the production designer Adam Stockhausen (“Moonrise Kingdom”) to come up with the look of the hotel, then had it built by a crew. Here is a closer look at the hotel, including commentary and ideas from Mr. Stockhausen.